A Clip Show: the OED, a presidential reading list, and poly-readers

September 8, 2010 at 12:00 am 2 comments

Welcome to your beginning-of-term LT Clip Show! Let’s see what’s in the hopper this week:

First off, the ongoing debate about “real books” vs. e-books finally gets a bit personal as e-books tear families apart! (Nothing like a little muckraking to stir things up, right?) Frankly, I’m surprised this didn’t happen sooner.

And speaking of which, let’s bid a fond, teary farewell (perhaps toast it with a spot of tea?) to the print version of the Oxford English Dictionary. The OED’s head recently announced that forthcoming editions of the hulking work will no longer be printed and will be available online only. Alas and alack! (Bright side: This news saves about twelve gazillion acres of trees!)

Meanwhile, the release of President Obama’s summer reading list caused quite a stir in book sales this year. The New York Times investigates this presidential reading trend.

Also in Washington, just a head’s up that the National Book Festival, sponsored by the Library of Congress, will take place on September 25. This should give you plenty of notice in case you want to hasten down to the capital to take part. The website has a lot of information about the Festival, although even after poking around I’m not quite sure what’s up. It’s nice that we’re celebrating books though, eh?

And lastly, NPR takes a look at “poly-readers,” or people who read multiple books at once. LT took a look at this trend this past spring but check out NPR’s take on the whole issue. They have an interesting perspective, pointing out the joy of randomly interconnected books and the fun to be had with juxtaposition. What do you make of it all?

As always, feel free to share any interesting reading or book-related clips you found recently in the comments below!

–Corey

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Entry filed under: Collections and Lists. Tags: , , , , , , .

The 39 Steps by John Buchan Giving up

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Kate  |  September 9, 2010 at 8:25 am

    That’s so interesting about poly-readers and randomly interconnected books — I actually found a random link between Kraken and White Teeth last night, though the odds that Chine Mieville was giving Zadie Smith a shout-out are slim to none.

    Also, though, that’s so sad about the OED. Just one more nail in the coffin of print. :(

    Reply
    • 2. Corey  |  September 9, 2010 at 4:31 pm

      Wasn’t it interesting?! I was seeing those interconnections when I was poly-reading but seeing it as a bad, distracting thing. Reading that transcript definitely made me rethink that. Even if they’re unintentional (yeah, China Mieville doesn’t seem the sort of shout out to Zadie Smith!), it’s fun to see connections sometimes.

      Poor OED indeed! They have a fabulous online version, but now you can’t just randomly flip open a volume and learn something random and new. I guess the site has a “random word please!” section, but it’s not really the same. I guess I’ll just live in a world where language is frozen in 2009 anytime I need to get some random word goodness. :)

      Reply

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